Samos

Samos

 

To the East of Samos is Turkey and Asia Minor, from which Samos is separated by the “Eptastadio” channel, (called Dar Bogaz in Turkish) whish is only 1650 meters wide at its narrowest point. To the North is the chersonese of Erythrea (Turkey), northwest is Chios Island, west and southwest are Ikaria and the Fournoi islands and to the south are the islands of the Dodecanese. The ones closest to Samos are Agathonisi, Arkoi and Patmos.

The evergreen Island of the world famous mathematician Pythagoras and the astrophysicist Aristarchos, offers large sandy beaches, crystal clear blue waters, traditional settlements, graphic narrow streets, exquisite passages and founded vegetation with vast unique vineyards.

      Sightseeing

Built on the ruins of the ancient city of Samos during the time of Polycrates, it condenses more than twenty – six centuries of Greek history. The town used to be known as Tigani, because of its shape, but later was named after the mathematician Pythagoras. The harbour, with its tavernas, coffee-shops, tourist shops and tables set out under the trees on one side, and its fishermen, boats and yachts of all sizes could be described as the quintessential scene of a Greek island. Licourgo Castle is in the village and slightly further out, is the airport.
The Heraion was for centuries the main ground of worship on the island. Before the temple was built there was a small altar on that location dated from the second millennium BC. Rituals of animal sacrifices were performed on that altar that also had a wooden statue of the goddess. The ‘ekatompedos’ temple of Hera was primary built in the 8th century BC and then again in the 7th, when a stone podium and a wooden fencing are added.

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